Women of Easter Rising Part II

I had a lot of fun researching Irish women who took part in Easter Rising for this episode, but I couldn’t cover them all in one sitting, so here is a thread of the other women who contributed to the Rising one or another. #WomensHistoryMonth Margaret Skinnider was a Scottish schoolteacher and suffragist who left… Continue reading Women of Easter Rising Part II

Irish Women Who went on Hunger Strike

Hunger strikes are a familiar weapon in the war against colonial policies and wrongful imprisonment. Although today it is associated primarily with Gandhi or with the IRA, like Bobby Sands, it is an old tactic practiced all over the world and by all genders, such as revolutionaries in Imperial Russia, suffragettes in Britain and the… Continue reading Irish Women Who went on Hunger Strike

Book Review: A History of God

A History of God by Karen Armstrong, Gramercy Books, 2004 Pros: Fair and balanced look into the history of Christianity, Islam, and Judaism. Succinct summary of dense information Well-written Cons: Lot of information Can be dense and is a long read Could be organized differently This is a well written and fair book that covers… Continue reading Book Review: A History of God

Review for the Irish Civil war: Law, Execution, and Atrocity

Irish Civil War: Law, Execution, and Atrocity by Sean Enright, Merrion Press, 2019 4/5 A slightly dry, but fascinating read about the executions that took place during the Irish Civil War. Like his prior book on the Easter Rising Trial, Sean spends the first half of the book providing historical and legal context for the… Continue reading Review for the Irish Civil war: Law, Execution, and Atrocity

Review for Fatal Path

Fatal Path: British Government and Irish Revolution 1919-1923 by Ronan Fanning, Faber and Faber, 2013 4/5 A light and easy read about the British perspective during the Anglo-Irish War. I greatly enjoyed this book. Since I normally read about the conflict from the side of the IRA/Irish Nationalist’s, this book was enjoyable and provided needed… Continue reading Review for Fatal Path

Book Review-The Woman Who Would be King

The Woman Who Would be King: Hatshepsut’s Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt by Kara Cooney, 2014, Crown Publishing   4/5   This is a well-written, engaging study of a fascinating woman from Ancient Egypt. It has an easy to read study and, while it sometimes strays a little too far into the theoretical, it… Continue reading Book Review-The Woman Who Would be King

The Battle of Ashbourne

Tuesday 25, April 1916 was a fine, spring day. There had been gentle showers earlier, but the land had dried since then, and the rest of week promised to be warm. After a disastrous start on Easter Sunday, things had gone as smoothly as could be expected for Irish Volunteer, Lieutenant Richard Mulcahy. After reporting… Continue reading The Battle of Ashbourne

More notes on Armenian Golgotha

I’ve been thinking about Balakian’s memoir and two points that stuck out the most to me were: the international community’s culpability/lack of proper response and Turkey’s complaints once the Armenians were murdered. Starting with the Turk’s complaints, it’s so similar to the U.S. right now, it’s terrifying. Balakin writes that the Armenians were the core… Continue reading More notes on Armenian Golgotha

Book Review: Armenian Golgotha

Armenian Golgotha by Grigoris Balakian. Published by Vintage in 2009. This memoir was written by Grigoris Balakian, a bishop of the Armenian Apostolic Church. Balakian was an educated Armenian, having studied in Germany and spoke Armenian, Turkish, and German. He was a survivor of the Armenian Genocide and wrote this memoir to chronicle what he… Continue reading Book Review: Armenian Golgotha