Episode 20-Interview with James Nagle

Today we have a very special episode where we spoke to James Nagle about what life was like for an average IRA recruit and a British soldier. If you enjoyed our big picture overview but want to dive deeper into what life was like for an IRA recruit on the run, a civilian having to please both the IRA and the British, or a Black and Tan riding a convoy worried about an ambush, this is the interview for you!

James is the host of the Irish Nation Lives, a history document on YouTube about the Irish War of Independence. Be sure to check his videos out and follow James on Twitter!

Episode 16-Cathal Brugha and the Irish War of Independence

Today we’ll be discussing Cathal Brugha’s role during the Irish War of Independence, including his struggles as minister of defense, his difficult relationship with Collins and Mulcahy, and his role in the Treaty debates.

Transcript

Voting Links:

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Protecting Ruth Ginsberg’s Seat Until After the Election

Resources

Irish Nation Lives Episode on Cathal Brugha

Cathal Brugha by Fergus O’Farrell 2018, University College Dublin Press

The Republic: the Fight for Irish Independence by Charles Townshend, 2014, Penguin Group

Fatal Path: British Government and Irish Revolution 1910-1922 by Ronan Fanning, 2013, Faber & Faber

Easter 1916: The Irish Rebellion by Charles Townshend, 2015, Penguin Group

A Nation and Not a Rabble: the Irish Revolution 1913-1923 by Diarmaid Ferriter, 2015, Profile Books

Richard Mulcahy: From the Politics of War to the Politics of Peace, 1913-1924 by Padraig O Caoimh, 2018, Irish Academic Press

Episode 15-Cathal Brugha and Easter Rising

Episode 15-Cathal Brugha and Easter Rising

Today we’ll be discussing Cathal Brugha and his role in the Gaelic League, Easter Rising, and the creation of Sinn Fein and the IRA.

Transcript

Voting Links:

Indivisible IL 09 Twitter Page

Indivisible Chicago Twitter Page

Indivisible Chicago South Side Twitter Page

Virus Free Voting

Payback Project

Protecting Ruth Ginsberg’s Seat Until After the Election

Resources

Irish Nation Lives Episode on Cathal Brugha’s Expedition to London

Irish Nation Lives Episode on Cathal Brugha

Cathal Brugha by Fergus O’Farrell 2018, University College Dublin Press

The Republic: the Fight for Irish Independence by Charles Townshend, 2014, Penguin Group

Fatal Path: British Government and Irish Revolution 1910-1922 by Ronan Fanning, 2013, Faber & Faber

Easter 1916: The Irish Rebellion by Charles Townshend, 2015, Penguin Group

A Nation and Not a Rabble: the Irish Revolution 1913-1923 by Diarmaid Ferriter, 2015, Profile Books

Richard Mulcahy: From the Politics of War to the Politics of Peace, 1913-1924 by Padraig O Caoimh, 2018, Irish Academic Press

Episode 14-Northern Ireland and the Irish War of Independence

Episode 14-Northern Ireland and the Irish War for Independence

Today we discuss Northern Ireland and the role it played during the Irish War Of Independence, discussing figures such as James Craig, Edward Carson, and David Lloyd George.

Transcript

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References

https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/heritage/james-craig-backbone-of-revolt-the-soul-of-intransigence-1.508452

https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/heritage/ireland-s-first-world-war-veterans-shunned-ostracised-murdered-1.3691036

https://www.irishnews.com/news/easterrising/2016/03/26/news/1916-46-000-from-belfast-volunteered-for-first-world-war-443443/

The Republic: the Fight for Irish Independence by Charles Townshend, 2014, Penguin Group

Fatal Path: British Government and Irish Revolution 1910-1922 by Ronan Fanning, 2013, Faber & Faber

Easter 1916: The Irish Rebellion by Charles Townshend, 2015, Penguin Group

A Nation and Not a Rabble: the Irish Revolution 1913-1923 by Diarmaid Ferriter, 2015, Profile Books

History in 5ish Minute: 5 Ways the IRA Disrupted the British Prison System

Welcome to History in 5ish minutes, a new episode format in which we discuss a historical event or person in roughly 5 mintues. Today we’ll be discussing the 5 ways the 1920s IRA and the Provisional IRA disrupted the British Prison System.

Transcript

Theme Sound: Symphony no. 5 in Cm, Op. 67 – III. Allegro

Image designed by @GraphicsHub3

References

The Republic: the Fight for Irish Independence by Charles Townshend, 2014, Penguin Group

Fatal Path: British Government and Irish Revolution 1910-1922 by Ronan Fanning, 2013, Faber & Faber

Richard Mulcahy: From the Politics of War to the Politics of Peace, 1913-1924 by Padraig O Caoimh, 2018, Irish Academic Press

A Nation and Not a Rabble: the Irish Revolution 1913-1923 by Diarmaid Ferriter, 2015, Profile Books

Michael Collins and the Anglo-Irish War: Britain’s Counterinsurgency Failure by J. B. E. Hittle, 2011, Potomac Books

Pawns in the Game: Irish Hunger Strikes 1912-1981 by Barry Flynn, 2012, Collins Press

Last Weapons: Hunger Strikes and Fasts in the British Empire, 1890-1948 by Kevin Grant, 2019, University of California Press

Armed Struggle: The History of the IRA by Richard English, 2005, Oxford University Press

Green Against Green by Mihcael Hopkinson, 2004, Gill Books

Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Mayhem in Northern Ireland by Patrick Radden Keefe, 2019, Doubleday

Episode 13 Michael Collins’ Intelligence War

Episode 13-Michael Collins’ Intelligence War

Today we discuss Michael Collins and his intelligence war including the formation of the Squad, his spies such as Ned Broy, David Neligan, and James MacNamara, and Bloody Sunday

Transcript

Theme Sound: Symphony no. 5 in Cm, Op. 67 – III. Allegro

Image designed by @GraphicsHub3

References:

The Republic: the Fight for Irish Independence by Charles Townshend, 2014, Penguin Group

Fatal Path: British Government and Irish Revolution 1910-1922 by Ronan Fanning, 2013, Faber & Faber

Richard Mulcahy: From the Politics of War to the Politics of Peace, 1913-1924 by Padraig O Caoimh, 2018, Irish Academic Press

A Nation and Not a Rabble: the Irish Revolution 1913-1923 by Diarmaid Ferriter, 2015, Profile Books

Michael Collins and the Anglo-Irish War: Britain’s Counterinsurgency Failure by J. B. E. Hittle, 2011, Potomac Books

Michael Collins and the Making of the Irish State by Gabriel Doherty, 1998, Mercier Press

https://www.irishcentral.com/roots/history/michael-collins-the-squad

https://www.irishexaminer.com/opinion/commentanalysis/arid-30939952.html

https://www.irishcentral.com/roots/history/michael-collins-the-squad

https://www.irishcentral.com/roots/history/michael-collins-twelve-apostles-who-was-in-charge

https://www.irishcentral.com/opinion/others/spies-in-the-castle-michael-collins

https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/heritage/michael-collins-s-women-spies-couriers-and-mothers-1.3071543

Episode 12-Hunger Strikes During the Irish War of Independence

 

In this episode, we discuss the role of hunger strikes during the Irish War of Independence, including the story of Thomas Ashe, the Mountjoy Prison and General Strike of 1918, and Terence MacSwiney.

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Episode 11-Interview with Dr. Mary McAuliffe

 

We are very excited to interview Dr. Mary McAuliffe about her new biography on Margaret Skinnider and the experience of Irish women during the Irish War for Independence and the Irish Civil War.

Buy Dr. McAuliffe’s biography on Margaret Skinnider here: http://www.ucdpress.ie/display.asp?isbn=9781910820537&

Follow Dr. McAuliffe of Twitter: https://twitter.com/marymcauliffe4

If you enjoyed this episode, please donate to our Ko-Fi

Transcript coming

Theme Sound: Symphony no. 5 in Cm, Op. 67 – III. Allegro

Image designed by @GraphicsHub3

Episode 10-Richard Mulcahy and the Irish War of Independence

In this episode we discuss Richard Mulcahy’s role as Chief of Staff of the IRA during the Irish War of Independence, including his efforts to instill discipline and organization, his difficult relationship with Brugha and DeValera, and his increased radicalization.

If you enjoyed this episode, please donate to our Ko-Fi

Transcript

Theme Sound: Symphony no. 5 in Cm, Op. 67 – III. Allegro

Image designed by @GraphicsHub3

BLM Links

Breathe Act

The Black National Convention

100 Days until Election

Three States One Mission

Movement for Black Lives

SURJ Chicago

Chicago Alliance Against Racist and Political Repression

8toAbolition

Episode References

The Republic: the Fight for Irish Independence by Charles Townshend, 2014, Penguin Group

Richard Mulcahy: From the Politics of War to the Politics of Peace, 1913-1924 by Padraig O Caoimh, 2018, Irish Academic Press

A Nation and Not a Rabble: the Irish Revolution 1913-1923 by Diarmaid Ferriter, 2015, Profile Books

Valiulis, M. G. (1993). Portrait of a Revolutionary: General Richard Mulcahy and the Founding of the Irish Free State. Lexington, KY: University Press of Kentucky.

Episode 9-Richard Mulcahy and Easter Rising

In this episode we talk about IRA”s chief of Staff, Richard Mulcahy’s role in Easter Rising and the efforts to rebuild the IRA up to 1919.

Transcript coming

Theme Sound: Symphony no. 5 in Cm, Op. 67 – III. Allegro

Image designed by @GraphicsHub3

BLM Links

Movement for Black Lives
SURJ Chicago
Chicago Alliance Against Racist and Political Repression
8toAbolition

Episode References

The Republic: the Fight for Irish Independence by Charles Townshend, 2014, Penguin Group

Richard Mulcahy: From the Politics of War to the Politics of Peace, 1913-1924 by Padraig O Caoimh, 2018, Irish Academic Press

A Nation and Not a Rabble: the Irish Revolution 1913-1923 by Diarmaid Ferriter, 2015, Profile Books

Easter 1916: The Irish Rebellion by Charles Townshend, 2015, Penguin Group

Valiulis, M. G. (1993). Portrait of a Revolutionary: General Richard Mulcahy and the Founding of the Irish Free State. Lexington, KY: University Press of Kentucky.

OBrien, P. (2012). Field of fire: The Battle of Ashbourne, 1916. Dublin: New Island.

https://www.rte.ie/archives/exhibitions/1993-easter-1916/portraits-1916/792906-portraits-1916-richard-mulcahy/

https://www.thepensivequill.com/2020/06/richard-mulcahy-from-politics-of-war-to.html

The 1916 Series: The Battle of Ashbourne

https://historywithatwist.wordpress.com/2016/03/25/easter-1916-the-forgotten-battle/

https://www.rte.ie/centuryireland/index.php/articles/ashbourne

 

Episode 8: Anglo-Irish War Part III 1921

Before we begin, we want to make it clear that this podcast and website knows Black Lives Matter and support the protesters demanding justice and arguing for the abolition of the police. There are links below on how we can help support the movement and challenge our own prejudices and educate ourselves.

This is the third and final episode in our three part special about the Anglo-Irish War. In this episode we briefly discuss Britain’s final attempts to defeat the IRA, DeValera’s return to Ireland and his attempts to exert control over the war, Mulcahy’s efforts to reorganize the IRA to ensure its survival, and the events that lead up to the truce.

Transcript coming

Theme Sound: Symphony no. 5 in Cm, Op. 67 – III. Allegro

Image designed by @GraphicsHub3

BLM Links

Movement for Black Lives
SURJ Chicago
Chicago Alliance Against Racist and Political Repression
8toAbolition

Episode References

The Republic: the Fight for Irish Independence by Charles Townshend, 2014, Penguin Group

Richard Mulcahy: From the Politics of War to the Politics of Peace, 1913-1924 by Padraig O Caoimh, 2018, Irish Academic Press

A Nation and Not a Rabble: the Irish Revolution 1913-1923 by Diarmaid Ferriter, 2015, Profile Books

Michael Collins and the Anglo-Irish War: Britain’s Counterinsurgency Failure by J. B. E. Hitte

Eamon DeValera by Ronan Fanning, 2016, Harvard University Press

Fatal Path: British Government and Irish Revolution 1910-1922 by Ronan Fanning, 2013, Faber & Faber

 

Overview of the Members of the GHQ Staff

 

In last week’s episode (included above), I talked about how the IRA organized itself, the tactics it used, and its relationship with members of the Dail. Since then, I’ve done some research into the members that made up the General Headquarters Staff. I even made a spreadsheet, capturing basic information about the men: GHQ Spreadsheet

Screenshot_2020-05-15 Members of IRA GHQ Staff - Members of IRA GHQ Staff pdf

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Episode 5 IRA: Formation and Organization

In this episode we talk about the IRA as an organization, how it was formed, the many different command structures it tried, its tactics, it’s relationship with civilian ministers, and the relationship between ground troops and General Headquarters

Transcript coming

Theme Sound: Symphony no. 5 in Cm, Op. 67 – III. Allegro

Image designed by @GraphicsHub3

References:

The Republic: the Fight for Irish Independence by Charles Townshend, 2014, Penguin Group

Richard Mulcahy: From the Politics of War to the Politics of Peace, 1913-1924 by Padraig O Caoimh, 2018, Irish Academic Press

A Nation and Not a Rabble: the Irish Revolution 1913-1923 by Diarmaid Ferriter, 2015, Profile Books

Michael Collins and the Anglo-Irish War: Britain’s Counterinsurgency Failure by J. B. E. Hitte, 2011, Potomac Books

Green Against Green: the Irish Civil War by Michael Hopkinson, 2004, Gill Books

Episode 4-The First Dail

Episode 4- The First Dail

In this episode we talk about the creation of the first Dail and its relation with the IRA

Transcript coming

Theme Sound: Symphony no. 5 in Cm, Op. 67 – III. Allegro

Image designed by @GraphicsHub3

References:

The Republic: the Fight for Irish Independence by Charles Townshend, 2014, Penguin Group

Fatal Path: British Government and Irish Revolution 1910-1922 by Ronan Fanning, 2013, Faber & Faber

A Nation and Not a Rabble: the Irish Revolution 1913-1923 by Diarmaid Ferriter, 2015, Profile Books

Eamon DeValera by Ronan Fanning, 2016, Harvard University Press

Episode 3-Ireland 1917-1918: Resurrecting a Rebellion

In this episode we talk about Ireland between 1917 and 1918, focusing on how Sinn Fein and the Irish Volunteers were able to rebuild themselves after Easter Rising.

Transcript

Theme Sound: Symphony no. 5 in Cm, Op. 67 – III. Allegro

Image designed by @GraphicsHub3

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Irish Women Who went on Hunger Strike

Hunger strikes are a familiar weapon in the war against colonial policies and wrongful imprisonment. Although today it is associated primarily with Gandhi or with the IRA, like Bobby Sands, it is an old tactic practiced all over the world and by all genders, such as revolutionaries in Imperial Russia, suffragettes in Britain and the U.S., and men kept in Guantanamo or the U.S.’s concentration camps on the American-Mexican border.

The tactic of voluntarily giving up food until a political demand is won, originated with the Russian Revolutionaries in the 1890s. It is a versatile weapon that requires utmost dedication from the striker while placing all the moral and legal responsibility on the oppressor and highlighting the wretched conditions that enables a striker to go on hunger strike in the first place.

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Episode 2-Women of Easter Rising

 

This episode will talk about five women who contributed to Easter Rising: Constance Markievicz, Kathleen Clarke, Winifred Carney, Hanna Sheehy-Skeffington, and Molly Osgood.

Transcript-Episode Two (PDF)

Theme Sound: Symphony no. 5 in Cm, Op. 67 – III. Allegro

Image designed by @GraphicsHub3

References:

The Republic: the Fight for Irish Independence by Charles Townshend, 2014, Penguin Group

Fatal Path: British Government and Irish Revolution 1910-1922 by Ronan Fanning, 2013, Faber & Faber

Easter 1916: The Irish Rebellion by Charles Townshend, 2015, Penguin Group

Richard Mulcahy: From the Politics of War to the Politics of Peace, 1913-1924 by Padraig O Caoimh, 2018, Irish Academic Press

A Nation and Not a Rabble: the Irish Revolution 1913-1923 by Diarmaid Ferriter, 2015, Profile Books

Green Against Green: the Irish Civil War by Michael Hopkinson, 2004, Gill Books

Michael Collins and the Anglo-Irish War: Britain’s Counterinsurgency Failure by J. B. E. Hitte, 2011, Potomac Books

The Battle of Ashbourne

Tuesday 25, April 1916 was a fine, spring day. There had been gentle showers earlier, but the land had dried since then, and the rest of week promised to be warm. After a disastrous start on Easter Sunday, things had gone as smoothly as could be expected for Irish Volunteer, Lieutenant Richard Mulcahy. After reporting to the GPO in Dublin on Monday, he and two other Volunteers were sent into the countryside to destroy the telegraph lines at Howth. Despite one Volunteer needing to be sent back for his rifle and briefly being stopped by the Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC), they reached their target and easily severed the lines[1]. Mulcahy on his way back to headquarters, stumbled upon the Fingal (5th) battalion, led by the charismatic and courageous Commandant Thomas Ashe. Mulcahy was instantly recognized and made Ashe’s second in command[2]. Together, they would spend a week, utilizing basic guerilla tactics to terrorize British forces in the countryside of Dublin County and capture three different British garrisons. They would end the week, with the Battle of Ashbourne, a desperate struggle that would pit Ashe’s leadership and Mulcahy’s analytical mind against the RIC’s discipline, arms, and experience. The battle, while often overshadows by the drama unfurling within Dublin, would provide a taste of what was to come during the Anglo-Irish War.

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Easter Rising

I decided to combine all my short Easter Rising posts, into a big one.

Easter Rising is one of the most momentous Irish rebellions in its long, tortuous and bloody history. It caught the British by surprise (despite the Castle knowing all there was to know about the planned exertion) and lasted for five days before being defeated by the British Army under General Maxwell. It was concentrated mostly in Dublin, with a few engagements in the countryside. While the rebellion itself was a failure, the execution of its leaders and the determination of its survivors, turned it into a spiritual and political victory that set the stage for the Anglo-Irish War and the Irish Civil War.

It nearly didn’t happen.

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Easter Rising: Surrender and Legacy

Thursday and Friday were some of the bloodiest days during Easter Rising. Cathal Brugha made a brilliant stand on Thursday, during the famous battle for South Dublin Union and Daly held the British forces at the Four Courts from Wednesday to Friday. Most importantly, Commander-in-chief General Sir John Maxwell arrived in Ireland on Friday. General Maxwell, perhaps, did more to ensure the spiritual and political success of the Rising than anyone else.

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Easter Rising-Tuesday and Wednesday

Despite knowing about the upcoming Rising, the British government in Ireland did little to prepare for it. Monday morning there were a total of 400 British soldiers on hand to respond to the rebellion. Townshend claims that there were 100 for each of the four barracks (Richmond, Marlborough, Royal, and Portobello). The rest of the police force had taken advantage of the holiday and had gone to the races. The small force engaged the rebels during Monday afternoon, but were unable to displace the Volunteers. This was a short lived victory for the rebels however, as by Monday night General Lowe had taken command, an additional 150 troops had arrived from Belfast with more reinforcements coming from England, and a colonel had brought up the artillery from Athlone. Lowe’s plan was to establish communication along the Kingsbridge-North Wall-Trinity College line, cutting the city in half, and then isolate the rebel forces from each other.

Martial law was declared that Monday, and the fate of Dublin was left in the military’s hands.

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Easter Rising: Sunday

Easter Rising is one of the most momentous Irish rebellions in its long, tortuous and bloody history. It caught the British by surprise (despite the Castle knowing all there was to know about the planned exertion) and lasted from April 24th to April 29th, before being defeated by the British Army under General Maxwell. It was concentrated mostly in Dublin, with a few engages in the countryside. While the rebellion itself was a failure, the execution of its leaders and the determination of its survivors, turned it into a spiritual and political victory that set the stage for the Anglo-Irish War and the Irish Civil War.

It nearly didn’t happen.

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Easter Rising Part 1: Pre-1916

Easter Rising is one of the most momentous moments in Irish history, setting the stage for the Anglo-Irish War in the 1920s, and continues to shape Irish society. But what is it and why did it happen? Easter Rising was an Irish protest concentrated mostly in Dublin with a few firefights in the countryside and was crushed by the British in about a week. Many consider the Rising itself to be a failure, but its political and social aftershocks made it a success.

To understand why the Rising happened, one most first familiarize themselves with Irish’s tortuous history. This post will briefly review some of the major events in Irish history, like Daniel O’Connell and the Young Irelanders, Charles Parnell and Home Rule, and John Redmond. It will then discuss the creation of the Irish Volunteers and the merging with the Irish Republican Brotherhood (IRB) as well as provide brief biographers on the major players of Easter Rising. It will be followed by a post that will describe the rising itself and a final post that will discuss its aftermath and legacy.

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Eamon de Valera Part I

There are few men who participated in the Anglo-Irish War and the Irish Civil War who have as complicated a legacy as Eamon de Valera. He was a mathematics professor, last man to surrender during Easter Rising, leader of the Dáil and the IRA, instigator of the anti-treaty movement, political outcast, and Taoiseach, and, finally, president of Ireland. He did more to shape the Irish constitution and its relations with both North Ireland and England than any other single person. His decisions didn’t always make sense and he hurt his own legacy as much as it was twisted over the trauma of the civil war and his lengthy presidency. However, it is his legacy and the mythos that surrounded him that makes him an interesting historical figure to study. I will discuss his life and legacy in two different posts. This first post will discuss de Valera’s leadership during the Anglo-Irish and Civil War and the second post will de Valera’s presidency and later period of his life.

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