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Thoughts on World War I

Yesterday, I was going to write a blog post about the 100th year anniversary of the WWI armistice and of Poland’s independence, but I couldn’t find the right words. I wanted to celebrate with Poland (lord knows they deserve it), while also properly reflecting on the war that killed 7 million civilians and 10 million… Continue reading Thoughts on World War I

The Battle of Ashbourne

Tuesday 25, April 1916 was a fine, spring day. There had been gentle showers earlier, but the land had dried since then, and the rest of week promised to be warm. After a disastrous start on Easter Sunday, things had gone as smoothly as could be expected for Irish Volunteer, Lieutenant Richard Mulcahy. After reporting… Continue reading The Battle of Ashbourne

5 Notorious Historical Figures with Supernatural Connections

Since it is Halloween, I thought it would be fun to write a post about the five notorious historical figures who have either inspired supernatural creatures or were confused for supernatural creatures. 6. Bela Kiss-the Vampire of Cinkola Bela Kiss was a Hungarian soldier who fought during WWI, a serial killer, and-possibly-a vampire. A man… Continue reading 5 Notorious Historical Figures with Supernatural Connections

More notes on Armenian Golgotha

I’ve been thinking about Balakian’s memoir and two points that stuck out the most to me were: the international community’s culpability/lack of proper response and Turkey’s complaints once the Armenians were murdered. Starting with the Turk’s complaints, it’s so similar to the U.S. right now, it’s terrifying. Balakin writes that the Armenians were the core… Continue reading More notes on Armenian Golgotha

Book Review: Armenian Golgotha

Armenian Golgotha by Grigoris Balakian. Published by Vintage in 2009. This memoir was written by Grigoris Balakian, a bishop of the Armenian Apostolic Church. Balakian was an educated Armenian, having studied in Germany and spoke Armenian, Turkish, and German. He was a survivor of the Armenian Genocide and wrote this memoir to chronicle what he… Continue reading Book Review: Armenian Golgotha

5 Famous Women of Central Asia

When I’m not reading/researching history topics, I write fiction. My newest project is a Middle Eastern/Central Asian novel about a royal family trying to keep out colonists and a growing terrorist ring wanting to recapture the glories of the past. While writing this book, I need to do a lot of research. This week, I’ve… Continue reading 5 Famous Women of Central Asia

Qodiriy, Fitrat, and Cho‘lpon

I recently finished Hamid Ismailov’s book the Devils’ Dance, which is about Abdulla Qodiriy’s last days in a Soviet prison and the book he was working on before his arrest. The book mentions several Uzbek writers who I was unfamiliar with, so I decided to do a little research. This was what I was able… Continue reading Qodiriy, Fitrat, and Cho‘lpon

Emir Nasrullah, Stoddart, and Connelly

A few months ago, I finished Hamid Ismailov’s the Devils’ Dance, which is a historical novel about the famous Uzbek writer, Abdulla Qodiriy’s last days in a Soviet prison, and the book the real Qodiriy was working on, but never published about an Uzbek princess, Oyxon, and the courts of Kokand and Bukhara. I was… Continue reading Emir Nasrullah, Stoddart, and Connelly

Book Review: Anonymous Soldiers

The Anonymous Soldiers by Bruce Hoffman. Published by Random House in 2015 This is a well written and well researched book that is easy to read, and is packed with information. While there is a lot in there, it’s not a ‘dense’ book. It is a definitely a book that needs to be ready multiple… Continue reading Book Review: Anonymous Soldiers

The Fall of Vicksburg

Today is the first week of July, an important week for American Civil War buffs. During this week, a 150 years ago, Lee took a great gamble at Gettysburg and lost, and Vicksburg finally fell to General Grant’s army. While the Battle of Gettysburg is an important battle and has reached mythical proportions in the… Continue reading The Fall of Vicksburg